All posts tagged turkey

  • memories of turkey

    This time two years ago, Cory and I were in Turkey. I never got around to writing about the trip in depth here, and I can’t quite do that now. Faces are now blurred and names have been forgotten, but there are still some things fresh in my mind: endless baskets of bread, kaymak (similar to clotted cream, and devoured with copious amounts of honey and bread), the winding streets of Cihangir, showering every street cat ever with love, using locals as shields when crossing busy streets (sorry guys), and stopping at juice stands at least twice a day for fresh pomegranate juice.

    One of my favorite things to do as a kid was to look through my mom’s photos, which she kept in a bag in the closet. I’d take it out every few months, dump the photos on the floor, and spend at least an hour looking at every one of them. I was endlessly fascinated by my parents’ lives before me a – my mom the babe, my dad’s facial hair, unfortunate perms, their early life together traveling across the country (they were carnies and left when I was about 2), faces of friends and relatives I never got to meet or didn’t remember.

    I still do this with my own photos, but with hard drives and memory cards instead of a bag of photos tucked in the closet. I decided to not share the same ol’ photos of the Sultanahmet Mosque and Hagia Sophia, but to mix things up a bit with a series of photos of people holding/carrying things. Fascinating, right?!

    crates
    Like crates.

    pastries
    Pastries.

    hats
    Hats.

    simit
    Simit (bread rings with sesame seeds).

    boys
    The tram on Istiklal street carrying a gaggle of boys.

    bread head
    Bread. And a man wearing a confederate flag t-shirt.

    galata
    Ok, let’s mix things up a bit with some non-carrying things photos. Approaching Galata tower.

    derp hagia sophia cat
    The derpy Hagia Sophia cat, who I later discovered has her own Tumblr.

    ephesus
    Ephesus, once home to 250,000 people. Now home to just about as many cats.

    selcuk
    I loved the Saturday market in Selcuk. I still have some paprika, chili pepper, and sumac left from our visit.

    breakfast
    Morning breakfasts at our cave hotel in Göreme…

    goreme
    … were enjoyed with this view.

    While we don’t have any international trips planned in the near future, I’m really itching to take a day trip to Seattle in the next month or two. I’ve never been and welcome any suggestions!

  • color palettes: turkey

    This time last year, we were just getting back from a two week trip to Turkey. It was an overwhelming, exhausting, and unforgettable trip filled with some of the best food of my life. And cats. So many lovable street cats. Once every couple of months, I find myself going through the, oh I don’t know, 1,000 or so photos I took during our visit and thinking to myself “were we really there? Why haven’t I made kaymak yet? Did I really spend a morning lazing on a hammock watching hot air balloons, in a town surrounded by phallic-shaped rocks? How many stray cats did I pet? 100? 200?”

    I’ve been working on a number of creative projects lately and I keep finding myself drawn to the photos I took in Turkey for color inspiration. Inspired by sites like Design Seeds, I’ve made a few color palette boards to help get me going various projects:

    color palettesAios Konstantinos Eleni Church in Mustafapasa. It was an optional part of one of our tours and we had to pay a small fee to go inside. It was lovely, peaceful, and we had the place to ourselves.

    ephesusMorning in Ephesus. Ephesus was once home to 50,000 Romans. Now it’s home to about 50,000 cats.

    fdHierapolis. Not pictured: throngs of Russian tourists in speedos and bikinis at nearby Pamukkale.

    istanbul-02Cihangir Istanbul, a neighborhood full of artists and intellectuals. And steep hills.

    istiklalTaken on Istiklal street in Istanbul. Istiklal street is a very busy, very crowded pedestrian (uh, mostly) street. Probably my favorite photo from our entire trip.

    sirinceSirince, a small (formerly Greek) village just outside of Ephesus. The village is known for its various wines, so Cory and I picked up a couple bottles of fruit wines (strawberry and peach). We spent a couple hours walking around, but there wasn’t much for us to do there. Picturesque, but painfully touristy.